Monday, June 24, 2013

Superbus Wubbo Ockels

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board. 

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.
Photo — Link

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

The first Superbus prototype, designed by former astronaut Wubbo Ockels and his team, is loaded into a KLM cargo plane at Schiphol airport, Amsterdam. The Superbus prototype will be presented in Dubai at the International Association of Public Transport exhibition. The electric Superbus is said to reach a speed of up to 250 kilometres per hour with up to 23 people on board.

Friday, June 21, 2013

Famous Castle of Krak des Chevaliers in Syria

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271. It became known as Crac de l'Ospital; the name Krak des Chevaliers was coined in the 19th century.

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

The Hospitallers began rebuilding the castle in the 1140s and were finished by 1170 when an earthquake damaged the castle. The order controlled a number of castles along the border of the County of Tripoli, a state founded after the First Crusade. Krak des Chevaliers was amongst the most important and acted as a centre of administration as well as a military base. After a second phase of building was undertaken in the 13th century, Krak des Chevaliers became a concentric castle. This phase created the outer wall and gave the castle its current appearance. The first half of the century has been described as Krak des Chevaliers' "golden age". At its peak, Krak des Chevaliers housed a garrison of around 2,000. Such a large garrison allowed the Hospitallers to extract tribute from a wide area. From the 1250s the fortunes of the Knights Hospitaller took a turn for the worse and in 1271 Krak des Chevaliers was captured by the Mamluk Sultan Baibars after a siege lasting 36 days, and then purportedly only by way of a forged letter purportedly from the Hospitallers' Grand Master that caused the Knights to surrender.

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Krak des Chevaliers, also Crac des Chevaliers, is a Crusader castle in Syria and one of the most important preserved medieval castles in the world. The site was first inhabited in the 11th century by a settlement of Kurds; as a result it was known as Hisn al Akrad, meaning the "Castle of the Kurds". In 1142 it was given by Raymond II, Count of Tripoli, to the Knights Hospitaller. It remained in their possession until it fell in 1271.
Photo — Link

Thursday, June 20, 2013

Breathtaking Images of Deserts from Space

Sugar — Located in North Africa
Sugar — Located in North Africa.

Dasht-i-Kavir desert in Iran
Dasht-i-Kavir desert in Iran.

The desert Rub al-Khali (the Middle East), which covers 583,000 square kilometers.
The desert Rub al-Khali (the Middle East), which covers 583,000 square kilometers.

The Namib Desert
The Namib Desert.

Oases in the United Arab Emirates
Oases in the United Arab Emirates.

Rocks, located in the Sahara
Rocks, located in the Sahara.

Lut Dasht-E - sand and saline desert. Located in the central part of the Iranian plateau in the east of Iran.
Lut Dasht-E - sand and saline desert. Located in the central part of the Iranian plateau in the east of Iran

Desert in Egypt
Desert in Egypt.

Dust storm in a desert (Chad)
Dust storm in a desert (Chad).

Libyan Desert
Libyan Desert.

Unianga lake in the Sahara Desert (Chad)
Unianga lake in the Sahara Desert (Chad).

The white lines of the Gobi Desert
The white lines of the Gobi Desert.

River in the Taklamakan Desert
River in the Taklamakan Desert.

Rub al-Khali desert - a vast sandy desert in the Middle East, occupying the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula.
Rub al-Khali desert - a vast sandy desert in the Middle East, occupying the southern third of the Arabian Peninsula.

Meteor Crater Aorounga. Located in the state of Chad
Meteor Crater Aorounga. Located in the state of Chad.

Uluru in Australia
Uluru in Australia.

The Namib Desert (Africa)
The Namib Desert (Africa).


Structure Richat (Guell-Aire Richat) - a geological formation located in the Mauritanian Sahara desert.
 Structure Richat (Guell-Aire Richat) - a geological formation located in the Mauritanian Sahara desert.

Brandberg Mountains, located on the edge of the Namib Desert
Brandberg Mountains, located on the edge of the Namib Desert.

Desert Dasht-i-Kavir

Desert Dasht-i-Kavir

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Guinness Glasses Combine to Form Dynamic Images

Guinness 250 is a spectacular visual ad campaign created by Act Two-Um, a creative agency based in London and New York. The company states that their purpose is to "transform your raw photography or initial creative concepts into dynamic and powerful imagery that can be the driving force behind your next acclaimed campaign," and they have certainly achieved some captivating results for Guinness.
Featuring more than 15,000 glasses, Guinness 250 is a collection of topographical images built within a computer-generated (CGi) environment. To create the artwork, Act Two-Um focused in on every major and minor detail, including lighting, skin texture, and hand poses, and even tailored individual ads to the local markets by changing the types of glasses that are being held. The final results feature the shapes of various continents and countries, a guitar, and even a small submarine in a collective toast to the delicious celebration of Guinness.






Sunday, June 16, 2013


This is real bread which is sculpted to look like a corpse. Thai baker Kittiwat Aun-A-Rom created it. He wants to show people that they should not just stick to the usual appearance of food,
When he first baked it, he didn’t think it would be popular and he didn’t think of marketing it. But when foreign media like A.P. Reuter wrote about his idea, many orders start pouring in from around the world such as U.S.A., Germany, Japan, South Korea etc. that
made him earn more than US$1000 per month.